10 Culinary Herbs to Grow in Your Garden

If you’re someone who’s interested in starting your own edible garden, an herb garden is a great place to start. An herb garden is good if you have a small space or you’re not sure yet if gardening is something you want to invest a lot into. When you grow your own culinary herbs they add more flavor to your dishes because they’re fresh. Which is honestly hard to find even at a local grocery store. Herbs have a shorter lifespan than other produce. You can start your own herb garden with just a single pot. And there’s such a wide variety of herbs that you can choose from to grow. So today we’re going to go over 10 culinary herbs to grow – and you can decide which of these you might want to grow for yourself.

10 Culinary Herbs to Grow in Your Garden10 Culinary Herbs to Grow

There are many benefits of growing your own herbs, including better flavor. Because it takes time for herbs to be harvested and delivered to your local grocery store, they can become wilted by the time they reach your table. Luckily, herbs are fairly easy to grow so you don’t have to lose quality.

There are many different herbs that you can grow and use to flavor your meals. Along with different flavors, every herb has its own unique growing conditions. Some herbs are annuals (lasting for one season) while others are perennials (lasting for multiple seasons). There are herbs that are cold sensitive and will incur damage from frosts, while others are cold hardy. Some like sunshine, some time shade. Some like soil that remains damp, while others prefer well-draining soil. The following 10 culinary herbs to grow include basic growing requirements, health benefits, and meal planning ideas so you can decide which you’d like to grow in your garden.

1. Basil

Basil - Culinary Herbs to Grow

Basil is often associated with Mediterranean foods like tomato sauce and pesto. Sweet basil pairs well with tomatoes, but it can be used with meat or seafood.

This herb contains powerful antioxidants. It contains anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties. Holy Basil (also called tulsi) is an adaptogen which helps your body to handle stress, which is great as a tea.

Basil is a tender annual that lasts until the first frost. It can actually be a perennial in hardiness zones of 10 and above, but this is a bit warmer than Central Florida. It typically takes 60-90 days from seed until it’s ready to start harvesting leaves.

  • Plant Type: Annual
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil Type: Rich, moist soil
  • Soil pH: 5.5-6.5
  • Seed Depth: 1/4th inch
  • Germination: 5-10 days

2. Cilantro

Cilantro - Culinary Herbs to Grow

Cilantro has a strong flavor that some people find “soapy,” but it’s still very popular. It’s typically used in Latin and Asian cooking. Salsa, guacamole, and rice dishes typically have cilantro as an ingredient. The seed from cilantro, coriander, is also used to add flavor to dishes. I personally don’t like the taste of cilantro, but I do appreciate the health benefits that it provides.

Cilantro is a great herb for detoxification of toxic heavy metals. Some plants are considered chelators, which means they bind to heavy metals to allow your body to rid them. Public water, beauty products, pesticides, and even air pollutants can cause heavy metals to be absorbed by your body.

Cilantro is a cold-hardy annual. When it comes to sun exposure, cilantro likes full to part sun. Cilantro is an annual that will bolt when temperatures rise and daytime lengthens during the summer, so growing during the fall or spring is ideal. Seeds should be planted 6-8 inches apart (or 9 per sqft with square foot gardening). It typically takes 50-55 days from seed until it’s ready to start harvesting leaves.

  • Plant Type: Annual
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • Soil Type: Rich, moist soil
  • Soil pH: 6.5-7
  • Seed Depth: 1/2″
  • Germination: 10-15 days

3. Chives

Chives - Culinary Herbs to Grow

Chives are a more mild member of the onion family. They’re commonly sliced and added to fish, soups, sauces, salads, and potato dishes. I personally love chopping up chives with an omelet or scrambled eggs.

Chives can help with digestion and boost your immune.

Chives are cool-season, cold-tolerant perennial. They can be harvested about 60 days after planting from seed. They can also be easily grown in containers.

  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • Soil Type: Dry soil
  • Soil pH: 6.0-7.0
  • Seed Depth: 1/4th inch
  • Germination: 10-15 days

4. Dill

Dill - Culinary Herbs to Grow

Dill is another strongly flavored herb that’s common in Europe and the Middle East. Both the seeds and foliage can be used to add flavor. It pairs well with all kinds of soft cheeses, omelets, seafood, potato salads, and cucumber dishes (including pickles!). 

Dill can help lower cholesterol and improve digestion.

Dill is easy to grow and reaches its full height of 2 to 3 feet in about six weeks. Because dill develops a deep tap root, it’s better to start it from seed instead of transplanting. It’s also good to plant a few dill plants together so that they can help support each other and not flop over in the wind.

  • Plant Type: Annual
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil Type: Well-drained soil
  • Soil pH: 5.5-6.5
  • Seed Depth: press into surface
  • Germination: 20-25 days

5. Ginger

Ginger - Culinary Herbs to Grow

Ginger is a zesty spice native to southeastern Asia. It’s popular in Asian cuisine such as stir-fries, but it can also be used in beverages, baked goods, marinades and on fruit and vegetables.

Ginger is good to have for flu and cold relief, as it helps to boost your immune and fight off infections. This spice is antibacterial as well as anti-inflammatory, antifungal, and contains antioxidants. Ginger helps to reduce nausea, pain, and inflammation. It can help with muscle pain from exercise, arthritis, and menstrual cramps. It also aids in digestion and relieves heartburn.

Ginger grows well in areas that have a hardiness zone of 7 or higher. It prefers tropical environments and can be easily grown from organic ginger that you purchase at your local grocery store. Learn more about how to grow ginger here.

  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Sun Exposure: Full to partial shade
  • Soil Type: Rich, well-draining soil
  • Soil pH: 6.0-8.0
  • Seed Depth: Rhizome should be planted 1″ below the surface
  • Germination: 2-4 weeks

6. Mint

Mint - Culinary Herbs to Grow Typically associated with sweeter meals, mint is still some times used for savory dishes – commonly paired with lamb. But it can also be used with desserts and drinks.

Mint can be used to boost your mood, improve your focus, ease nausea, and help digestion.

When growing mint you have to be careful, because it’s an invasive plant. It’s best to grow in containers if you don’t want it taking over your yard. Mint has runners that will spread otherwise. Mint grows well if transplanted and will mature from seed after about 90 days.

  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to part shade
  • Soil Type: Rich, moist soil
  • Soil pH: 6.0-7.0
  • Seed Depth: 1/4″
  • Germination: 7-14 days

7. Oregano

Oregano - Culinary Herbs to Grow

Oregano is a Mediterranean herb that goes well with pizzas and sauces. It’s used in a lot of Italian, Greek, and Spanish dishes.

Oregano is full of antioxidants and is known for being an immune booster, antifungal, and antibacterial. Oil of oregano is one of my go-tos whenever I have a cold.

Like other Mediterranean herbs, oregano likes well-draining soil so it’s important to let the soil dry between waterings. Oregano likes sunny spots, but in hardiness zones 7+ it can also appreciate some afternoon shade.

  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil Type: Well-draining soil
  • Soil pH: 6.5-7.0
  • Seed Depth: 1/8th – 1/4th inch
  • Germination: 5-10 days

8. Parsley

Parsley - Culinary Herbs to Grow

Parsley is a light peppery herb that can complement other seasonings. It’s typically used in sauces and soups or sprinkled over dishes at the end of cooking for a flash of green and a fresh taste. Flat-leaf parsley has a good flavor for cooking while curly parsley is typically used as a garnish.

Parsley is another herb that helps detoxify your body of toxic heavy metals. It’s also a natural diuretic that can help reduce water retention and bloating.

Parsley is a biennial which means it can grow for 2 growing seasons (somewhere between an annual and perennial). It does take a decent amount of time for parsley seeds to germinate, but you can start harvesting the outer leaves one the plant is about 6 inches tall.

  • Plant Type: Biennial
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • Soil Type: Rich, moist soil
  • Soil pH: 5.0-7.0
  • Seed Depth: 1/4th inch
  • Germination: 14-28 days

9. Rosemary

Rosemary - Culinary Herbs to Grow

Rosemary has a very strong lemon-pine flavor that pairs well with garlic and olive oil. It can be added to tomato sauce, pizza, lamb, and pork. It’s best to use a small amount because of its strong flavor.

Health benefits include improved concentration and digestion as well as boosting your immune system.

Rosemary is a perennial shrub that can live up to 20 years. It grows well with full sun and can grow up to 4 feet tall. It likes well-draining soil and the soil should become dry between waterings. 

  • Plant Type: Perennial (in zones 8+)
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil Type: Well-draining soil
  • Soil pH: 5.0-6.0
  • Seed Depth: Surface
  • Germination: 15-30 days

10. Sage

Sage - Culinary Herbs to GrowThe soft leaves of sage are typically used around Thanksgiving for stuffing, but it’s also good with soup, roasted vegetables, and meat.

Sage can help improve brain function and memory.

Sage is a cold hardy perennial. It likes full sun and well-draining soil. The soil should become dry between waterings. 

  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil Type: Well-draining soil
  • Soil pH: 5.5-6.5
  • Seed Depth: 1/4th inch
  • Germination: 7-20 days

 

What are your favorite culinary herbs to grow? Comment below!

10 Culinary Herbs to Grow in Your Garden

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.